Tuesday, 1 October 2013

Thunderf00t does science (or does he?) - Part 5

Remember the rape/theft analogy that we discounted earlier? It's back:
Again, to take the analogy with theft, you choose to put locks on doors to reduce your chances of being burgled. Only a moron takes his locks off the door and puts a sign in the window saying "Don't teach me to lock MY door, teach your children not to steal!"

And it's not just dumb feminists who hold this line - the Rape Crisis centre of England and Wales states: "If you have been raped, the most important thing to remember is that it was not your fault." And while this might be mostly true, it's also not helpful in reducing the number of rapes.
Given that what he's quoting here is advice for people who have already been raped, maybe it's not specifically designed to be helpful in the manner Thunderf00t would like. Maybe - just maybe - it's aimed to comfort and assist a person reeling from a traumatic experience.

But let's not consider that, because we have to believe that sentence is supposed to be prevention advice or else the next part of his argument makes no sense.

Yeah, I realise at this point that's redundant. Anyway:
Because the statement implies that women have no agency of their own, no ability to affect the outcome by taking sensible precautions. That is, the statement reduces women to the level of passive objects who have no control whatsoever over their environment.
I feel that might be reading a little bit much into a platitude aimed at relieving pain - but strap in, because Thunderf00t is about to say something that's correct (albeit in the most patronising manner possible, but hey):
This is just not true.  Women do have minds! They are capable of risk and hazard assessment and minimising such factors.
Sheesh. And those dumb feminists have been reducing women to passive objects! It's lucky Thunderf00t is around to tell us that women have minds. 

But he's not done yet. Back to analysing the statement from the Rape Crisis Centre:
This statement encourages women to think they have no influence whatsoever on what happens to them, and that there is nothing they can do to minimise the risks of being sexually assaulted and that's just a really bad message to send, in that it subjects women to enhanced risk of sexual assault by inhibiting them from trying to minimise their risks of becoming a victim.
Now I'm not a scientist. But that paragraph looks very much like what a scientist might term a hypothesis.

hy·poth·e·sis

noun \hī-ˈpä-thə-səs\ : an idea or theory that is not proven but that leads to further study or discussion

We could perhaps phrase it like this:

"I believe that the statement 'the most important thing to remember is that it was not your fault' encourages women to think they have no influence on what happens to them, and will in fact inhibit them from minimising their risks of becoming a victim."


So, as I said, I'm no scientist. But Phil Mason is one. And from what I understand about scientists, after they present a hypothesis, there's usually a process of testing or experimentation or observation or evidence-gathering before any conclusions can be drawn.

So the next part of the video - a video made by a scientist, let's not forget - must surely be a report of the methodology used to test the above hypothesis and a summary of the results. Or at the very least, a reference to the work of somebody who has carried out this research and reached conclusions that support the hypothesis Thunderf00t presents here.

And I'm aching to know:
Does the statement 'the most important thing to remember is that it was not your fault' encourage women to think they have no influence on what happens to them, and inhibit them from minimising their risks of becoming a victim?


What were your findings, Phil?
So what common sense precautions can be taken to reduce your chances of being raped?
Ah.


10 comments:

Cyborg said...

Is the phrase 'the most important thing to remember is that it was not your fault' aimed at women specifically or just anyone who has been raped in general?

If the statement is unisex then why would Tf00t assume it is a 'bad message to send' to women in particular?

Mike Booth said...

That's a good point. He doesn't seem very interested in male victims of rape; don't know if he mentions men later.

Aunty Vlad said...

Rape = burglary is not a very good analogy. You lock your door when you are not at the house. But you are always there when someone rapes you. Also stuff is not people. Also if the burglar represents the rapist, who is meant by:
the homeowner
the house
the loot?

Maybe he should try again using bashings for his analogy. Do you think it would get through to him then?

DEEN said...

"Only a moron takes his locks off the door and puts a sign in the window saying "Don't teach me to lock MY door, teach your children not to steal!""
It's more a matter of "I already know how to lock my door, thank you very much. And how's that going to prevent them from smashing a window? Or should I just live without daylight from now on?"

Eric Bragg said...

Isn't he kind of saying that if you go out and get drunk, and someone robs you, then well it was your fault for getting drunk and putting yourself in the position to be easily robbed? That you shouldn't be able to go to the police and report the robbery because you ostensibably consented to being robbed because you know that when your drunk its easier to rob you?

Erik Bray said...

"This is just not true. Women do have minds! They are capable of risk and hazard assessment and minimising such factors."

I was once counter-protesting a bunch of particularly nasty forced-birthers who had set up their aborted fetus pictures on the campus where I work.

One of them, who was in some way involved with an execrable anti-abortion film, decided after a couple of hours to confront me and spew a bunch of bullshit at me. I opted, in this case, to ignore him--after all he had sunglasses on and I didn't so that was a little unfair.

Anyways, at a certain point he basically made this same argument. "Women aren't stupid" he said, "they know what they're getting into when they have sex". This was the point at which I *almost* lost my resolve with this asshole.

So anyways, congratulations Phil, you sound exactly like an anti-abortion misogynist.

Skemono said...

This is just not true. Women do have minds!

If only he had figured that out a few minutes earlier, that might have factored into his whole "where does it become rape" graph. Instead the axis was about men's motivation, instead of women's consent.

Tom Foss said...

It's worth noting, too, that it's not your fault if your home is robbed, either. It doesn't matter how much nice stuff you own or how often you leave your door unlocked or whatever, it's still the choice and fault of the robber to walk into your house and take your stuff.

Dawat said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tychoxi said...

I think this is the part that most got to me: 'the most important thing to remember is that it was not your fault'.

That phrase is there because self-blame and feelings of guilt are common in rape victims! The wikipedia article on "Effects_and_aftermath_of_rape" is not superb but has some citations on the subject. (Let's ignore the part that victim blaming may have on that too). And as you imply, I'm sure that phrase is used because experimentation (ie. psychiatric analyses of rape victims) has shielded self-blame as a *very* common occurrence.

Also, cool of you to take the time to write a concise response to the nonsense.